THE KITE RUNNER BY KHALED HOSSEINI BOOK

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The Kite Runner is the first novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini. Published in by Riverhead Books, it tells the story of Amir, a young boy from . The Kite Runner book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. “It may be unfair, but what happens in a few days, sometimes ev. And the Mountains Echoed. The Kite Runner Graphic Novel. A Thousand Splendid Suns Illustrated Edition. See all books by Khaled Hosseini.


The Kite Runner By Khaled Hosseini Book

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ISBN:889-2-79275-479-5
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The Kite Runner [Khaled Hosseini] on ediclumpoti.tk *FREE* Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers editorially hand-picked. Kite Runner [Khaled Hosseini] on ediclumpoti.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Afghanistan, Twelve-year-old Amir is desperate to win the local. download a cheap copy of The Kite Runner book by Khaled Hosseini. In his debut novel, The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini accomplishes what very few contemporary.

Even though Amir has committed these sins, the inner strength that he had all along, but thought was somehow missing from his character, breaks though to allow him to find Sohrab and free him from the clutches of Assef. In this same way, when Sohrab falls into a great inner depression and tries to commit suicide, the spirit within him emerges and he finds his way to happiness again.

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It is true as seen in this novel that there are essentially evil individuals who are impossible to redeem and that the evil they do affects all people around them. Assef is such a character. He enjoys hurting others physically, emotionally, and psychologically. If there is a Hell, he is bound for it.

However, there is also the evil found in all of us, no matter how good we are most of the time, which allows us to do bad things to those we love the most.

The reasons may vary for why we commit such sins, but in the end, it is all about needing some sort of power in our lives. Fortunately, this evil is redeemable when we are ready to atone and right the wrongs we have committed. Amir's father, a wealthy merchant Amir affectionately refers to as Baba, loves both boys. He makes a point of downloading Hassan exactly the same things as Amir, to Amir's annoyance.

He even pays to have Hassan's cleft lip surgically corrected. On the other hand, Baba jan is often critical of Amir, considering him weak and lacking in courage, even threatening to physically punish him when he complains about Hassan. Amir finds a kinder fatherly figure in Rahim Khan, Baba's closest friend, who understands him and supports his interest in writing, whereas Baba considers that interest to be worthy only of females.

In a rare moment when Amir is sitting on Baba jan's lap rather than being shooed away as a bother he asks why his father drinks alcohol which is forbidden by Islam. Baba jan tells him that the Mullahs are hypocrites and the only real sin is theft which takes many forms. Assef, an older boy with a sadistic taste for violence, mocks Amir for socializing with a Hazara, which according to him, is an inferior race whose members belong only in Hazarajat.

Assef is himself only half Pashtun, having a German mother and a typical blond haired blue eyed German appearance.

The Kite Runner

One day, he prepares to attack Amir with brass knuckles , but Hassan defends Amir, threatening to shoot out Assef's eye with his slingshot. Assef backs off but swears to take revenge one day. One triumphant day, Amir wins the local kite fighting tournament and finally earns Baba's praise. Hassan runs for the last cut kite, a great trophy, saying to Amir, "For you, a thousand times over.

Hassan refuses to give up the kite, and Assef severely beats him and rapes him. Amir witnesses the act but is too scared to intervene.

He knows that if he fails to bring home the kite, Baba would be less proud of him. He feels incredibly guilty but knows his cowardice would destroy any hopes for Baba's affections, so he keeps quiet about the incident. Afterwards, Amir keeps distant from Hassan; his feelings of guilt prevent him from interacting with the boy. Hassan's mental and physical well-being begin to deteriorate. Amir begins to believe that life would be easier if Hassan were not around, so he plants a watch and some money under Hassan's mattress in hopes that Baba will make him leave; Hassan falsely confesses when confronted by Baba.

Although Baba believes "there is no act more wretched than stealing", he forgives him. Amir is freed of the daily reminder of his cowardice and betrayal, but he still lives in their shadow.

In , five years later, the Soviet Union militarily intervened in Afghanistan. Baba and Amir escape to Peshawar , Pakistan , and then to Fremont, California , where they settle in a run-down apartment.

Baba begins work at a gas station. After graduating from high school, Amir takes classes at San Jose State University to develop his writing skills. There, Amir meets fellow refugee Soraya Taheri and her family. Baba is diagnosed with terminal cancer but is still capable of granting Amir one last favor: He agrees and the two marry. Shortly thereafter Baba dies. Amir and Soraya settle down in a happy marriage, but to their sorrow, they learn that they cannot have children. Amir embarks on a successful career as a novelist.

Fifteen years after his wedding, Amir receives a call from his father's best friend and his childhood father figure Rahim Khan. Khan, who is dying, asks Amir to visit him in Peshawar. He enigmatically tells Amir, "There is a way to be good again.

Ali was killed by a land mine. Hassan and his wife were killed after Hassan refused to allow the Taliban to confiscate Baba and Amir's house in Kabul. Rahim Khan further reveals that Ali was sterile and was not Hassan's biological father. Hassan was actually Baba and Ali's wife, Sanaubar's, son and Amir's half brother. Finally, Khan tells Amir that the reason he has called Amir to Pakistan is to ask him to rescue Hassan's son, Sohrab, from an orphanage in Kabul.

Amir, searches for Sohrab, accompanied by Farid, an Afghan taxi driver and veteran of the war with the Soviets.

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They learn that a Taliban official comes to the orphanage often, brings cash, and usually takes a girl away with him. Occasionally he chooses a boy, recently Sohrab. The orphanage director tells Amir how to find the official, and Farid secures an appointment at his home by claiming to have "personal business" with him.

Amir meets the Taliban leader, who reveals himself as Assef. Sohrab is being kept at Assef's house as a dancer. Assef agrees to relinquish him if Amir can beat him in a fight. Assef then badly beats Amir, breaking several bones, until Sohrab uses a slingshot to fire a brass ball into Assef's left eye.

Sohrab helps Amir out of the house, where he passes out and wakes up in a hospital. Amir tells Sohrab of his plans to take him back to America and possibly adopt him. However, American authorities demand evidence of Sohrab's orphan status. Amir tells Sohrab that he may have to go back to the orphanage for a little while as they encounter a problem in the adoption process, and Sohrab, terrified about returning to the orphanage, attempts suicide.

Amir eventually manages to take him back to the United States. After his adoption, Sohrab refuses to interact with Amir or Soraya until the former reminisces about Hassan and kites and shows off some of Hassan's tricks. In the end, Sohrab only gives a lopsided smile, but Amir takes it with all his heart as he runs the kite for Sohrab, saying, "For you, a thousand times over.

Because its themes of friendship, betrayal, guilt, redemption and the uneasy love between fathers and sons are universal, and not specifically Afghan, the book has been able to reach across cultural, racial, religious and gender gaps to resonate with readers of varying backgrounds. Khaled Hosseini identifies a number of themes that appear in The Kite Runner , but reviewers have focused on guilt and redemption.

Even after leaving the country, moving to America, marrying, and becoming a successful writer, he is unable to forget the incident. Hassan is "the all-sacrificing Christ-figure, the one who, even in death, calls Amir to redemption". Amir's motivation for the childhood betrayal is rooted in his insecurities regarding his relationship with his father. Both [ The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns ] are multigenerational, and so the relationship between parent and child, with all of its manifest complexities and contradictions, is a prominent theme.

Occasionally he chooses a boy, recently Sohrab.

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The orphanage director tells Amir how to find the official, and Farid secures an appointment at his home by claiming to have "personal business" with him.

Amir meets the Taliban leader, who reveals himself as Assef. Sohrab is being kept at Assef's house as a dancer. Assef agrees to relinquish him if Amir can beat him in a fight. Assef then badly beats Amir, breaking several bones, until Sohrab uses a slingshot to fire a brass ball into Assef's left eye.

The Kite Runner

Sohrab helps Amir out of the house, where he passes out and wakes up in a hospital. Amir tells Sohrab of his plans to take him back to America and possibly adopt him. However, American authorities demand evidence of Sohrab's orphan status. Amir tells Sohrab that he may have to go back to the orphanage for a little while as they encounter a problem in the adoption process, and Sohrab, terrified about returning to the orphanage, attempts suicide.

Amir eventually manages to take him back to the United States. After his adoption, Sohrab refuses to interact with Amir or Soraya until Amir reminisces about Hassan and kites and shows off some of Hassan's tricks. In the end, Sohrab only gives a lopsided smile, but Amir takes it with all his heart as he runs the kite for Sohrab, saying, "For you, a thousand times over. Khaled Hosseini acknowledged that the character is "an unlikable coward who failed to come to the aid of his best friend" for much of the duration of the story; consequently, Hosseini chose to create sympathy for Amir through circumstances rather than the personality he was given until the last third of the book.

As a child, he enjoys storytelling and is encouraged by Rahim Khan to become a well known writer.

At age 18, he and his father flee to America following the Soviet Military invasion of Afghanistan, where he pursues his dream of being a writer. Hassan is Amir's closest childhood friend.

He is described as having a China doll face, green eyes, and a harelip. Hosseini regards him as a flat character in terms of development; he is "a lovely guy and you root for him and you love him but he's not complicated".

Moreover, it would make Hassan a Pashtun according to tribal law and not Hazara as he's actually the son of Baba, and ironic for Assef to bully him as both Assef and Hassan are half Pashtuns. Hassan is later killed by the Taliban for refusal to abandon Amir's property.

Assef is the son of a Pashtun father and a German mother, and believes that Pashtuns are superior to Hazaras, although he himself is not a full Pashtun. As a teenager, he is a neighborhood bully and is enamored with Hitler and Nazism. He is described as a " sociopath " by Amir.

He rapes Hassan to get revenge on Amir. As an adult, he joins the Taliban and sexually abuses Hassan's son, Sohrab and other children of Sohrab's orphanage.

Baba is Amir's father and a wealthy businessman who aids the community by creating businesses for others and building a new orphanage. He is the biological father of Hassan, a fact he hides from both of his children, and seems to favor him over Amir. Baba does not endorse the extremist religious views of the clerics at Amir's school. After fleeing to America, he works at a gas station. He dies from cancer in , shortly after Amir and Soraya's wedding. Ali is Baba's servant, a Hazara believed to be Hassan's father.

He was adopted as a child by Baba's father after his parents were killed by a drunk driver. Before the events of the novel, Ali had been struck with polio, rendering his right leg useless.

The kite runner

Because of this, Ali is constantly tormented by children in the town.For those of you who are not in a reading group, read it and then loan it to a friend. View all 9 comments. In war, people are often forced to make great sacrifices, and the young Amir himself commits an act of betrayal, towards his best friend Hassan no less, which will haunt him for the rest of his life.

I kept imagining I was reading about my dad. Below is my complete review: For you, A thousand times over. Do you feel better? If you can live with a broken heart and are able to deal with the pain, this book his highly recommended. Well, about 15 of them to be exact.

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